Home

Articles Photos Museums Events Store Archives Media About Contacts
Home
About
Archives
Articles
Authors/ Books
Chuck Wagon
Contacts
Events
Links
Marshall Trimble
Media
Museums
People
Photos
Place Names
Music
Quotes
States
Store
Subscribe
Trivia
 
GUEST BOOK
 

  PHOTO ARCHIVES
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

PHOTO ARCHIVES
Alchesay, William Hart, Apr 07    A  
Arizona Quarters Introduction
June 2008!


 

 

A

 


 

Canyon Creek Ranch 12/15/07   C  

Cave Creek Museum

 

     
Fiesta Days Parade April 2008!      
Flagstaff AZ Post Office circa 1860, May 07      
Loup Valley, Nebraska, ca. 1886, May 07      
Noble, Marguarite, May 07      
Prescott Rodeo Parade
July 2008!
     
       
Shuttle U
Grand Opening
August 2008
     
Stagecoach, Apr 07      
Yuma Territorial Prison, May 07      
National Archives  

 

 

Loup Valley, Nebraska, ca. 1886, May 07
Cropped from Item 134. (69-N-13606C)
National Archives - Platte River looped around itself. This was an end of the day site for the pioneer wagon trail.
 Photo at right

By 1848 the United States had acquired official title to the contiguous land stretching westward to the Pacific, south to the Rio Grande, and north to the 49th parallel. Americans had long since explored and settled in many of these areas, but legitimate possession created impetus for development that began to crystallize as other timely occurrences brought a greater influx of people to the West. The religious persecution of the Mormons had led them to begin their migration westward by this time. The discovery of gold would soon draw thousands more across the country. The opportunity to start a new life and own land motivated many to head West.

This transition from a "wild" western frontier into organized segments of a federal union is documented in photographs. Private citizens and Government officials took the recently developed camera on their western adventures to record nature's curious sights and the marks that they as men and women made on the landscape. It is indeed a wonder that so many photographs have survived the hardships of the western experience, for early negatives were made of large glass plates. Some of these photographs have found their way into the National Archives as record materials of several Federal bureaus and offices, such as the Bureaus of Land Management, Indian Affairs, Public Roads, Weather, Agricultural Economics, and Reclamation; the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Geological Survey, boundary and claims commissions and arbitrations, the Corps of Engineers, the Forest Service, and the Signal Corps. The photograph above was selected from the records of these agencies now on deposit in the National Archives.

While the records of Federal agencies continue to document changes on the face of western America and the efforts toward effecting some kind of progress, an arbitrary cutoff date of 1912 has been used. At that time Arizona, the last of the contiguous 48 United States, was admitted to the Union. Having arrived at its destiny, the "Wild" West was in a sense officially terminated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

  Home

Articles Photos Museums Events Store Archives Media About Contacts

GUEST BOOK

© 2007 Wild West Gazette
Webmaster Crazy Cowgirl
Design by www.acrazycowgirl.com